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that maybe one of the things that creates a sense of peacefulness in the social environment is that we have so many different religions and a first amendment that protects religious freedom that we don't have one religion rising to the surface or competing or two or three. well, one thing we wanted to do with our new version of beliefs and believers is to go to a part of the world where we do see more of the tensions between religion, and the spot we picked on, dare i say, was israel and then to some extent egypt. and we wanted to go to israel in particular because there isn't such a diverse cultural environment in terms of religion, so that the tensions are, in some senses, watered down. as we all know, unless you've been meditating in a cave for the past 20 years, israel and the social environment in israel is very tense in terms of the relationship between the three great faiths that actually share something of a cultural tradition- judaism, christianity, and islam. and so what we- we have an extraordinary opportunity, and something like a great risk. i'm surprised david ainsworth, our e
started working war college, every faculty member was high up as a full professor. in an environment where they are so right conscious, the idea of hiring people, all faculty members as a full professor is just unheard of and hurt the institutional credibility. trying to explain that to a kernel of why they should not be a full professor fell on ears. this is a problem how to administrators who really have no experience is part of the problem. the other part of the problem and i'll be honest i'll be writing a following chapter of the department chair from the naval war college, captain tony were body are doing a book chapter that was the oversight? with the supervision? there to supervising organizations with something called military education coordinating council -- the military loves acronyms. a part of the pentagon called the g7, part of the joint staff. the congress is busy. we on the sequestration is basically taking up all of their time. the economy. now that allows those in the pentagon and those that this military coordinating council, to basically it our what i've been told they
an environment that both of us could write about. >> bill: you write about a terror attack in boston and then it actually happens. when it happened what went through your mind? >> shock. very upsetting. period. i mean, nobody wants that to happen. we even had an incident in water town in the book. and this muslim brotherhood and started in boston and expands. >> your tears are mumples? >> muslim brotherhood, absolutely. >> bill: you can't do that you just heard our muslim guest. >> of course you can we can and we will. not all muslims are a terrorist. everyone that is attacking us happens to be. >> i don't think president obama is going to read your book. >> i tried to get in the white house. it hasn't happened yet. >> maybe you if you said unnamed terrorists. >> book from me to the white house i don't see it happen. >> the book is bed terrorist. mocking cnn for terror coverage. crowley and colmes. one of the murdered three americans before the attack last week. investigation is going on. we hope you stay tuned to those reports. ... but with advair, i'm breathing better. so now i can
an encreasing challenge to america's military. this is the environment that is facing the department of defense as it enters a third year of flat or declining budgets. the onset of these constraints has led to belt tightening in military modernization, force structure, personnel costs and overhead expenditures. it has given us the opportunity to reshape the military and reform defense institutions to better reflect 21st century realities. the process began under the leadership of secretary gates. secretary gates curtailed more than 30 modernization programs and trimmed overhead costs within the military services and across the defense enterprise. the realignment continued secretary panetta who crafted new strategic guidance in an f.y. 2013 defense budget plan which reduced the department's top line by $487 billion over the course of a decade. the president's request of $526.6 billion for fy 2014 continues to implement the president's defense strategic guidance and enhances the department's efforts at institutional reform. most critically, it sustains the quality of the all-volunteer force and t
that that kind of environment will propagate. >> and let me jump in there to try to- to put it in the framework of the class. that is the difficulty. that is the difficulty, because we have, you know, from an ethical point of view, where we're moved towards an understanding that is inclusive- we're being asked to treat other human beings in a way that is not so self-centered. but both of you, actually, i think are saying very similar things, which is there seems to be a problem in that inherent selfishness finds its way into any culture in any religion. what you're saying, susanna, really strikes me with the law profession, is that if you're- and we're back to the experiential dimension- if you conceive of yourself as the spoke in the wheel, you're the hub, the world revolves around you and everybody else is going to ultimately be after you, then it's very difficult to not take the newspapers, to not want to find a way to get ahead, to jump ahead. but you know, that's the way it is in society. warren, go ahead; you've had your hand waving. >> i always hear that this is a very litigious society
-- [inaudible] the serious threat assessment our threat environment is changing. threats are more interconnected and viral. defense which it first -- disruption with the u.s national interest. i would ketrn to a few of the issues e identify in the statement for the record. our statement to the lead was cyber. as mor more state and demonstrate actors gained expertise. it's important to reach a global threat cannot be overstated. this year our discussion natural resources also more prominent because climb in disease and competition for natural resources and huge national security implications. many import are extreme war and food stress that can destablize governments that can trigger conflict. on the issue of terrorism, the threat from al qaeda and the potential for a massive coordinated attack on the united may be diminished. but it's more diffuse. as the president stated on tuesday about the boston marathon bombing we don't know it was planned by an group effort or individual act. lone inspire our affiliated group are determined to attack. the turmoil in the arab world brought a spike in threat
-rich environment for the terrorists. we've been waiting for a long team for the next incident, and tragically it just happened today in boston. >> governor, what do you glean from the information that we do have at this hour? what do you glean from the fact there was about a 14-second interval before the second bomb went off? what do you glean from the fact that there were other devices that were, thankfully, found by the police department and they were able to detonate them? does it fit any one pattern of any group? i know it's speculation, but. >> sure. first of all, i want to compliment you, you said we have more questions than answers and i think that's important. we don't want to answer our own questions until we get more information. my view has changed just even in the past couple hours. we know it was a rudiment try, fundamental device. mark furman said you can probably make a similar device with ingredients from your own home. but at one time it was two devices and one two undetonated now there may be as many as five. then the question becomes is there one person involved? unlikely,
of exchanges going on right now. forward to a post 2013 environment, to you believe these multibillion-dollar payments will continue regardless of their being an american presence or nato troop presence in afghanistan? maintaineve we need to a constructive and effective relationship with pakistan. we need to recognize the real threat that pakistan has inside of its own borders. from my perspective we have to do whatever it takes to ensure that our national vital interests is protected. >> one of the things i am always looking into that aid is whether or not it does serve the military. you are saying we need to do whatever it takes to continue that relationship. are you saying that payments of that size and nature are going to be what is required in the long run? >> i believe it is in our best interest to continue to develop the pakistani army in ensuring that they can effectively deal issues in their borders. i cannot tell you that every program we have in place is one we ought to assisting in the future. that is not something i paying particular attention to in my current duties. i am
store and there are issues i have about consumer protection in that environment. while i appreciate, it is a concept that could work, we need strategies that are going to take into consideration varying factors and that the goal here, and in addition to being able to be in the black, is that, you have a public service and we have to serve these con at this time cents. i would really encourage you with your leadership on the board of governors to really think about ways that are going to be unique, more than just flexibility to get there. that you're looking at quality, connectivity, those relationships, the rural fabric in these states, related to the post office. when i was in inaing the postal service was a very effective partner in receiving those constituents, thank you. i yield back. >> thank you. and recognize the gentleman from mr. georgia. >> thank you, mr. chairman. just in listening and writing down notes, we went all over the map from the importance of postal service. i don't think anybody will detract from that. we talked before. you been in committees before. i serve an
improvement. what does it feel like on the ground? do peel feel like we are in another high risk environment given this mass murder? >> i was in manhattan the day of 9/11. so it feels, it felt similar for maybe 10 or 12 hours but it seems like boston is back going about its day. not unlike the way new york kind of recovered as quickly as they did. i think one has to hope that the communicate responds quickly. that they're resilient. i think that the international nature of the boston marathon is helpful in an odd way at this point. people will go back to their countries and be as resilient as we need to be as americans. i think that these people who were engaged in this thing were out here living a purpose driven life. they were raising capital and raising funds for things that mattered to them. they were here for causes and in many instances and i think if the history is any judge, they'll be back to doing that very quickly. >> amen. thank you very much for that. >> up next, why would someone do this? we'll get into that question next. money. that's not much, you think. except it's 2% every
there is almost a divorce on how earnings and economies grow. connell: how does that environment sustain itself? >> is it sustainable in the long run, no. that means over a ten year cycle. i am focused over the next year or two years. earnings can continue to grow because we see 20% of s&p 500 companies hoarding. only 45% have beat revenues. i think that we could be in a period of time where we have a divergence in the markets between those that are doing really well and those that are not doing really well at all. you could get a lot of disparities. connell: brian jacobson, wells fargo, thank you very much. appreciate it. >> thank you. dagen: rilling knowing about it through minor. connell: at&t versus google. we will tell you why. we will keep an eye on the market. a big day today. oil is down. we will be back with much more on market now. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] help brazil reduce its ovell reliance on foreign imports with the launch of the country's largest petrochemical operation. ♪ when emerson takes up the challenge, "it's never been done before" simply bemes consider it solved.
neighborhood and dangerous environment. earlier today we had a terrible tragedy in the united states in boston, where lives were lost, in what seems to be a bombing or potential terrorist attack. i don't want to jump to conclusion and as a new yorker who lived through september 11, 2001, terrorism is something that whenever it rears its ugly head, all people of goodwill must condemn it. people of israel voo lived through that and lived through bombings at pizza shops and weddings and random bombings of people who don't care about life but care about death. so we pause, of course, for the loss of life in boston today and understand that when israel has gone through a terrorist attack, there is a similar crying out of wanton acts of terror. . i just returned from israel, i had the honor to have traveling there with president obama. the president is working feverishly to try to move toward a two-state solution which all of us believe is the best thing that could happen, a palestinian state and an israeli jewish state and certainly the united states its allay, stand by israel. i'll be going -- its
east have more experience with terrorism. and their security environment reflect that reality. but here in the u.s., there is a delicate balancing act between liberty and security. and it's still a work in progress. bret? >> bret: steve centanni live here in d.c. steve, thank you. some of the most compelling accounts to come out of boston are from the eyewitnesses. and the people who tried to help. correspondent douglas kennedy has that part of the story. [explosion] >> the bomb that where to through boilston street took with it lives and dreams. in fact, many people in boston and the nation. especially those who saw the mayhem firsthand. >> it went off, you know, my ears, you know, just from the compression of the explosive device hit us and shattered the window next to us. and, you know, and i looked back and i see a cloud of smoke. >> it took probably five or ten seconds to realize what had happened because it couldn't happen there. so, it was just too surreal. >> still personal tragedy quickly turned into communal hope as the city almost instantly came together. to comfort the falle
and the rest of the middle east have more experience with terrorism. and their security environment reflect that reality. but here in the u.s., there is a delicate balancing act between liberty and security. and it's still a work in progress. bret? >> bret: steve centanni live here in d.c. steve, thank you. some of the most compelling accounts to come out of boston are from the eyewitnesses. and the people who tried to help. correspondent douglas kennedy has that part of the story. [explosion] >> the bomb that where to through boilston street took with it lives and dreams. in fact, many people in boston and the nation. especially those who saw the mayhem firsthand. >> it went off, you know, my ears, you know, just from the compression of the explosive device hit us and shattered the window next to us. and, you know, and i looked back and i see a cloud of smoke. >> it took probably five or ten seconds to realize what had happened because it couldn't happen there. so, it was just too surreal. >> still personal tragedy quickly turned into communal hope as the city almost instantly came togethe
may also be a constraining factor. living in a bad home environment can be a big distraction. budget cuts is probably the worst problem of all. >> scheduled cuts that would take place unless congress acts would mean 8.2% cuts. >> cut. >> yes, cut. and these aren't just dollar signs in percent. they are children's futures. >> programs are designed to pick up the slack for kids whose needs aren't being met. all of those programs are designed to deliver needs of children not being met by the larger system. to cut seven point eight percent would have an incredible impact on students across america. >> before we fix the educational system, we need to find out what meets [indiscernible] >> we do have room for improvement. one of the areas that we are weak in is allowing students the opportunity to be creative in their learning and for us to decided relevance for students. with the advent of technologies, students don't teachers foreed information. they can go to the internet and get answers. but what they do need teachers for his what information is relevant? what information is accurate?
sweating in a cold environment. they're focused on what they're doing. they don't fit in with the crowd. so this is a way of actually, without the technology, but with the civilians or police or law enforcement officers actually looking for suspects in a crowd, these are some ways that you can actually find and detect a suspect like this. >> mike: you've been the pictures of the boston suspects. would they have given you cause for concern just by their appearances, the way they were behaving? >> no doubt, no doubt. immediately after the events, obviously, i was watching the video stream coming through. you can see that the crowd watching the finish of the boston marathon are watching the runners whereas these two were not watching the marathon at all. you know, they were very focused on where they were going. one was walking after the other, in a hurry, it seemed. their dress, their stride, the walk. there's a specific walk that a suspect of this nature has. a characteristic that a normal person, under normal circumstances, wouldn't have. so with the right training, even civilians can be le
to this environment. >> clayton: would you need to show that the suspect was abouting on behalf of foreign power or in capacity as a military combatant to try him in a military trial? >> that is correct or treat him, put him in military system. we have don't have all the facts but the arguement is this. his older brother was inducted in al-qaeda affiliateddentity while he was being trained in russia. he came back and inducted his own brother. not all the facts on the table but what is troubling to me and senator whose statement you read is the administration is utterly uninterested in exploring this. they want the option off the table. instead of waiting for days or a couple of weeks until all the facts are in. i will be the first one to say if the facts don't support the classification as enemy combatant we should not do that, but we should not rush the process to give benefit of treating it as enemy combatant. >> clayton: what stood out to me the president's comments we're safe. we got him there. seemed to be a sense of wait a second, do we know all of the details yet? do we know the connectio
town environment of boston. >> you really couldn't believe it. certainly an eerie sight, alex. yesterday the streets of boston should have been teeming with commuters. there should have been tourists. there should have been people outside enjoying the weather. but instead they were hunkered down. they were staying inside, heeding orders that there was a terrorist, potentially on the loose. about 1 million people ordered to stay inside. to lock their doors. boston and its surrounding suburbs were virtually under siege. a lockdown in the suburbs, a shelter in place order for the city. >> we're asking people to shelter in place. in other words to stay indoors with their doors locked, and not to open the door for anyone other than a properly identified law enforcement officer. >> reporter: it was early friday morning when dzhokhar tsarnaev escaped a police shoot-out in watertown. forcing officials to shut down a 20-block radius, and demanding residents stay indoors for their own safety. >> i've just never seen it this way. i mean, even in the latest hours at night it's never this
environment, we are warriors as opposed to common criminals who should be should be investigated and based on that investigation prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law? many people have made grandiose claims about wanting to be in a war. how that ends up getting decided is based on facts on the ground. it is based on law and facts not on suppositions or on the grandiose claims of people who would like to be bigger than they are. >> host: him ma shamsi with the aclu, american civil libertis. and cliff may, foundation for defense of democracies. he writes a weekly column distributed by scripps howard news service and contributes to nationalreview.online, townhall.com among other publications a lot of folks want to talk to you. let's get back to the lines. charles, wood bridge, virginia, republican, go ahead. >> caller: thanks. you know i am a republican and i am an american obviously and i, my stance is that, i believe -- [inaudible] >> host: charles, we're losing you right as we get. >> caller: i'm sorry. >> host: say it again? >> caller: thank you, i'm sorry. i believe that the admini
some of the actions taken in the post-9/11 environment. there's some key questions one of -- some key questions we wanted to address this point but to the treatment of suspects -- rise to the level of torture quick secondly, if so, how did this happen? and what can we learn from this to make better decisions in the future? on the first question, we found that u.s. personnel in many instances use interrogation techniques on detainees that constitute torture. american personnel conducted an even larger number of interrogations that involve cruel, inhumane or degrading treatment. both categories of actions violate u.s. laws and international treaty obligations. this conclusion is not based upon our own personal impressions, but rather is grounded in a thorough and detailed examination of what constitutes torture from a historical and legal context. we looked at court cases and determined that the treatment of detainees in many instances met the standards, the courts have determined as constituting torture. but in addition you look at the united states state department in its annual count
. this is a report from environment energy news -- talk about the push back. guest: it is interesting that comes from this group. we were talking earlier about the impact -- host: between the majors and the independents? guest: exactly at would be the smaller companies that would feel the brunt of this if the tax code was adjusted. they put all drill that maxwell and there is fewer dollars, there will be less wells that were drilled. another argument they bring up -- we have discussed two tax preferences so far which are intangible drilling costs and percentage to live -- depletion and these are industries specific. they are only available to the oil and gas industry. the argument being made here is that they are similar to other tax preferences that exist in the tax code. that our = availabl to other industries outside of oil and gas. host: are the proposals on capitol hill to just target the major industries as opposed to these independent producers? guest: the president is targeting of the entire industry. certain pieces of legislation, notably from senator robert menendez from new jersey introduc
easy. it is challenging in this fiscal environment. administrations 39 budget -- $39 million budget request. consistent with what congress appropriated in 2013 for the department before sequestration cuts were applied. the level of funding in this budget is lower than what congress appropriated in 2009. stepping back and thinking of the challenges that our country and this department has faced since 2009, times square bombing, hurricane sandy, the ever-changing and growing cyber threat, and of the boston attack, it is easy to become concerned with this budget request. we are facing extremely difficult budgetary times. sacrifices must be made. they may not receive all of the funding. and agencies in government must share in the sacrifice to some extent required during this deficit. our secretary seems to have taken this message to heart. he is identified $1.3 billion in savings this year and more than $4 billion since 2009. he continues to move from a risk-based approach and it effort to save more money. i'm happy to see this budget proposes a much-needed increase for cybersecurity,
is that they see the light. the leaves of the iris are constantly monitoring light environment. they're actually may sewering how long the night is. >> reporter: it has nothing to do with summer. it is all about recognizing... >> the length of the day and the length of the night. >> reporter: this blooming iris was captured in time lapse video by film maker lewis swarsberg. the images show case the wonder of these plants. which can detect and respond to light even color. >> just like we can see red, blue and green, plants can see red, blue and even u.v. light. >> reporter: in some ways plants have a greater spectrum of light. >> they see more than we do. from a plant's point of view we're visually challenged. we only have four or five photo receptors, proteins that can see the light in our bodies. plants have like 13. >> they don't have sense organs in the way that we do. they don't have eyes or ears or noses, but they have receptors. and that's the level at which humans and plants are the same. >> reporter: amy litt is the director of plant-gemomics at the botanical garden. she explains that so
in an urban environment and there's a lot of buildings around and other materials that will stop some of this evidence as it crawls across the pavement and it will be found. the agents will go in and start conducting a crime scene investigation to find even the most minute pieces of evidence and what we call bag and tag and send to the laboratory. in the laboratory, the forensic scientists, examiners, will look at these pieces of debris and then start making conclusions as to what the device consisted of. >> how do you-- i understand how you could piece together what was the bomb made of. how did it work, how was it detonated and so on. but how-- we're told in the pan am 103 bombing which you helped investigate, that it was a thumbnail sized piece of evidence that led to the identity of the bomber. i mean, how can that be? how can you get to the identity from the remnants of the bomber? >> well, sometimes in pan am 103, the fragment of the circuit board that was the timer that detonated the device, is so generically-- well, not generically, but so specific you can relate that back to
ripe environment, target rich environment. it's just tragic to go from this horrific scene, i think everybody was just shocked, but i'll tell you what, i'm angry. i know a lot of other people are angry. i got a text, a long text from doug flutie, former quarterback, as you know, boston college fame, saying where do i sign up? who do we go and get? you see joann drowsy helping out a -- andruzi helping out. we're going to do a top to bottom review of what went right and wrong and make sure it doesn't happen again. >> steve: i understand the anger. but you look at all the first responders, all the police officers, all the national guardsmen who were there yesterday. the city was vigilant. yet it just takes one. >> listen, it does take one. certainly because it is the marathon, it is the showcase, really of the city and the state, you have all those people there anyway. thank goodness they were actually there because the first responders, the medical personnel, the tents are right there. they're able to adjust from high duration to almost like a war type of reaction, type of force to pr
work environment, that their paychecks will arrive on time and the benefits they earn are the ones they receive. under president clinton, john served as deputy assistant secretary and acting assistant secretary for law enforcement at the treasury department. overseeing the united states secret service and the bureau of alcohol, tobacco and firearms. and he later moved to the interior department where he was assistant secretary for policy, management and budget, essentially the manager of the department of interior. before coming to the office of personnel management, john spent nearly a decade working on conservation as director of the fish and wildlife foundation, and then arguably the job he perhaps has enjoyed most, he became director of the national zoo. at the national zoo, he was so successful turning around a faltering institution that after he left they named a lion in his honor. john indeed was a lion, a lion on behalf of the federal employees, a lion on behalf of good government, a lion on behalf of integrity. john know he is a true leader and manager and an incredibly wa
and the reason is because the environment had so radically changed in a very short period of time. that's one of the things i detail. >> when we look at hawaii now we don't see that. we see the plantations and that sort of thing. so, t.d.? >> what i found out when i was researching this book is the paradise like other things is an intellectual and social construct and just as there is a paper trail in the spanish illusion that gold was to be found in florida, by the way i just want to clarify one thing it begins with the first massacre of white men in the western hemisphere certainly and north america and this is how our history began with a spanish learned there was nothing to be found. it was only tradition in florida, that was before they found out that they had established a settlement in jacksonville so they tore across the atlantic and massacred several hundred frenchmen and that is the beginning of the history. as i say in the beginning if we look at -- for this old guy looking for viagra and largely america thinks here comes a hurricane this is no understanding, but if you look at the
. >> thanks, al. >>> up next, makeup that's good for you and the environment, right after this. hi, listen i think you could do better. oh no, he's a nice guy. no i'm talking abt your yogurt. see dannon oikos is so rich and thick and smooth. so smooth. in a national taste test dannon oikos fat free rawber flavor beat chobani 2 to 1. mmmm. stamos? look babe - i'm doing better. she means the yogurt. join us babe. try it for yrself. dannon oikos greek nonfat yogurt. ♪ dannon it'not a ndy bar. 130 calories 7 grams of protein the new fiber one caramel nut protein bar. for those nights when it's more than a bad dream, be ready. for the times you need to double-check th temperature on the thermometer, be ready. for high fever, nothing works faster or lasts longer. be ready with children's motrin. or lasts longer. igarnier invents olia. a haircolor breakthrough. our first monia-ee permanent color, pored by oil. olia propepe color deep. pure, luminous, vivid color. visibly improves and restores hair. new olia by garnier. i'm over the hill. my bod'k the way it used to. past my prime? i'm a victim o
, constructing support mounts for objects, doing additional cleaning in a dry, stable environment. b. altman goal is to put these into the gallery and be able to share as much of the story of how these pumps operated, how they were made, what you're used for, their historical accounts from the sinking. we know that up to last when water put out the oilers, the pumps stopped moving. those are the things to consider is when dupont got here, the valve was still in position at its last moment. the think of the crew of monitor and the things they experienced and the struggles that they undertook to preserve c it ison and how ironi that today 100 petite years later they are still serving the nation in ways they could never have imagined, helping us understand marine conservation, understanding our past, and helping us look forward and learned from the lessons of the past. >> this weekend, looking at the history and literary lights for virginia beach, virginia, including more from the mariners' museum, saturday and noon eastern on c-span2. and sunday at 5:00 on american on c-span3. >> washington journal
environment. the ultimate goal is to put these into the gallery and be able to share is much of the operatedhow the pumps and how they were made. we know that the one in front of us up until almost the last moment was working hard to try to keep the ship from sinking. unfortunately, when the water pushes out the oilers -- ump stoppede p moving. >> i think of the crew of the monitor and the things they experienced and the struggles that they undertook to preserve the union and how ironic is that today, 151 years later, they are still serving the nation but in a very different way and in ways they could never imagine, for helping us understand marine conservation and about our past and helping us move forward and learn from the lessons of the past. to, looking at the history and literary life of virginia beach, virginia, including more from the mariners' museum, saturday and noon eastern on c-span2. and sunday at 5:00 on c-span3. >> "washington journal" continues. texaswe're back with republican louie gohmert, a member of the judiciary committee. thanks for being here. guest: n
women who left restrictive religious environments. lea said he felt ostracised not following her family's strict faith and that her family stopped supporting her when she was just 16 years old. lea, welcome. thank you so much for being here. [applause] >> thank you. katie: you know, i think we should say first of all, there are many variations to all faiths. christianity, is lamb, but you describe your faith as ultra orthodox. so, what did that mean growing up in your home, lea? >> so, even within ultraorthodox, there are many, many different sects. in my family that meant we believed, we under god's will in a way nobody else did. it was a very strict interpretation of biblical law. the sabbath was observed very strictly. cosher had a whole set of extra rules that other jews may not have been familiar with. there was a strict segregation of the sexes. girls and women were supposed to be very modest and really our whole lives were very much shaped and defined by this identity. katie: what kind of limitations were put on you as a girl growing up in your family? >> well, for me as a girl,
of our natural environment, and it's not -- it's not the best feeling in the world to feel like you're stuck indefinitely in your apartment, and you don't feel particularly safe. like our windows aren't bulletproof or anything. and to hear cop cars going speeding by every few minutes. it's jarring. >> and have you been -- obviously your husband was texted by his work not to come in to work so you were alerted as to what the situation was. but we've been told that police were robo calling or what's called a reverse 911 calling all residents of watertown. have you been told -- >> let's just tell you what's happening behind us right now. just to be clear, what's happening right now is that police cars are behind us right now, and businesses, filled -- filled with police are driving right behind us right now. presumably headed i don't know where, because the scope of this investigation is getting wider and wider by the minute. we just saw two buses filled with law enforcement personnel leaving us. they're headed west. that could easily be to the watertown area. which is the epicenter of
chemicals that poison our water... and harm wildlife. and millions... are polluting our environment. [ sniffing ] [ seagulls squawking ] >>> row, row, row your boat. a live look there at crew. wow, they are really going this morning. yeah, it's going to be a warm day. find some water if you can. >> five snow boarders have died in what officials are calling colorado's deadliest avalanche in five decades. it happened yesterday afternoon near loveland pass about 50 miles west of denver. authorities say six snowboarders were on the almost 12,000 foot high pass when all of a sudden the snow gave way. >> they triggered a slide. at least one of them was able to bail off to the side and partially buried, but he was able to get himself out and call for help. >> authorities say the avalanche was about 600 feet wide and 8 feet deep. right now, authorities say the avalanche danger in colorado is at a 30 year high due to a lack of snow. >>> some people in the town of west, texas, are being allowed back into their homes for the first time since that deadly fertilizer explosion. a curfew is sti
carbon pollution in the environment than we have in nearly 20 years, but we understand this is not enough. we've got to do better, and that's why we've got to pursue an all of the above numbering strategy that includes investing in more biofuels and more fuel efficient vehicles and more solar and wind power and more people going back to work building cars and homes and businesses that are more energy efficient than the ones we've got right now. that's why i've proposed new job-creating investments in science and innovation. and all these young people, as young as they are, they're all going to be going to college, and a lot of them are going to want to continue to pursue tear research and pursue their dreams. and if there is not the research grant pipeline in place, many of them will not have the resources to invent and discover the things that will make us healthier and make us more energy efficient and improve the quality of our lives. so this is not the time to gut investments that keep our businesses on the cutting edge. that keep our economy humming, that improving, you know, the qua
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